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Relocation Africa Director, Rene Stegmann, Appointed Non-executive Director of British Chamber of Business in Southern Africa

By

Relocation Africa Group, TIRA Member, South Africa

 

We are proud to announce that TIRA President and Relocation Africa Director, Rene Stegmann, has been appointed as a Non-executive Director of the British Chamber of Business in Southern Africa.

Relocation Africa Group has been an active member of the British Chamber since 2015. Through Rene’s new appointment, we will be able to have a greater impact on the success of the Chamber’s many initiatives in Southern Africa.

The Chamber is a British Chambers of Commerce affiliated Chamber, part of the Overseas Business Networks initiative, a key program of the British government that intends to stimulate and strengthen international business networks and UK exports.

Through the OBNi, the British Chambers of Commerce and the Department for International Trade are delivering an international UK business network to provide UK companies with a wider range of practical, end to end business support and access to a global network of experienced private sector support.

Members of the British Chamber have access to event and networking opportunities throughout the year, market intelligence and support, as well as the opportunity to engage with government and civil society representatives on matters of policy, to improve upon the SA-UK trade relationship.

For more information about the British Chamber, visit their website by clicking here, and for a list of their current members, click here.

This article was originally published here.

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More about Relocation Africa
Relocation Africa is an African Mobility Service Company that assists individuals and corporate clients to settle their relocated families and employees into a new environment as efficiently as possible.

Website: www.relocationafrica.com
Twitter: @ReloAfrica
LinkedIn: Relocation Africa (PTY) LTD
Facebook: Relocation Africa

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More about TIRA
TIRA is an aligned network of quality mobility service providers. The network provides access to leading mobility experts from around the world that provide local solutions to global challenges. Network members exchange best practices and share this value with the industry through benchmarking exercises.

Website: www.tiranetwork.org
Twitter: @TIRAORG
LinkedIn: The International Relocation Associates (TIRA)
Facebook: The International Relocation Associates (TIRA)

What to Look Out For When Buying Property Overseas

By

Relocation Africa Group, TIRA Member, South Africa

Buying property abroad as an expat can require more research, and may involve more risks than buying in your home country. You should start planning the purchase well in advance, do some research on formalities such as visa requirements for buyers and mortgage conditions, and get expert advice when necessary. Expat.com has put together a guide to finding and buying the right property for you, whether it’s an investment solution, a holiday home, or a permanent residence.

Know why you want to buy a property

In all cases, a property is a type of investment, however, before purchasing real estate, define the main reasons behind such a costly move. If you are buying with investment in mind, look in tourist hubs or big cities which are popular among digital nomads, leisure, and business travellers. These properties tend to go up in value and secure a high rental income throughout the year. On the other hand, if you are searching to buy your permanent home abroad to settle in with your family, consider the cost and quality of life, accessibility, population of expat community, and facilities (e.g. hospitals, schools, entertainment) in different regions in the country before you conclude.

Create a budget

Owning property doesn’t only involve the cost of buying it — there are more expenses to consider beyond the price of the house. To complete a real estate purchase and to make the house livable or profitable, you will have to pay the broker’s and attorney’s fees, taxes, and spend money on furniture and appliances. For example, in Spain, a stamp duty, which is the tax you pay on any property purchase, is about one per cent of the purchase price, and a VAT tax is about ten per cent. Also, there is a yearly ownership tax which fluctuates from property to property and location to location; in Spain, it starts from 100 Euros and goes up to as much as 3,000. In general, you may end up spending an additional 2 to 5 per cent of the purchase price in closing fees.

Research the different regions

Before deciding on a specific location, it’s a good idea to understand what everyday life is like in the area. If you aim to rent out your property to holidaymakers, make sure the area is well-connected and has attractions, as well as activities for different ages and tastes. Also, do market research to check whether property values in the region have been declining or increasing in recent years. This will help you understand whether a property purchase in this location is a good investment or a risky one. The best way to get a clear picture of all the above is to rent a house for a few weeks and explore the area where you plan to buy with the mindset of a permanent resident.

Consider all types of properties

Do you prefer to buy a new construction property, which won’t require any refurbishment or a resale property in which you can apply your creativity and renovation ideas? There are also off-plan properties, which have been approved for construction by the local authorities, but it is likely that the house will not be built due to bureaucracy, the bankruptcy of the development company, or other reasons.

Hire a property agent and an attorney

Once you have decided on the region, type of property, and budget ask the help of a property agent, who will narrow down the options for you based on your criteria. However, keep in mind that a property agent may not always prioritise your best interest, but the sellers, as often it is the seller who pays the agent’s commissions. If you aren’t fluent in the official language of the country you want to buy property in, an attorney (who speaks your native language too and is registered with the local bar association) will guide you through the process and the local real property laws.

Organise the formalities

Depending on your expatriation plans, you will have to apply for a different visa to stay and purchase real estate in your host country. For example, if you wish to retire overseas, you will need a resident permit, which allows you to live in the country without working — as long as you can prove that your pension from back home is adequate to support you financially while abroad. Many countries such as Spain, Portugal, the Bahamas, and Mauritius offer residency in exchange for foreign investment in property, which is worth more than a certain amount.

Get a survey and an inspection done

Before you make up your mind about a property, book an inspection to find out about defects in the house that most likely aren’t obvious, and about structural improvements that you can make. A survey, which is also done by experts, will tell you where is the beginning and end of your property and land; also you will find out about the exact locations of underground cables and pipes.

Negotiate the contract

Before signing the contract for your property purchase, make sure that you have no unanswered questions left. Among other details, the contract has deadlines, both for you and the seller, for different stages of the process depending on the type of property you are buying. Some information you should see on the contract is the date of completion for an off-plan construction, scheduled repairs and the person in charge to cover the cost, taxes, etc.

Close on the property

To close on your desired house, you should be able to pay an initial deposit, which varies from one country to another. In Europe, it’s about ten per cent, whereas in the USA and Australia it’s up to 20 per cent. In general, a bigger deposit increases the chances of the approval of your loan and means borrowing less money, thus paying less interest to the bank. This final stage of your purchase should take place at a notary’s office, and if you cannot be there in person, you have the option to send a representative.

This article was originally published here.

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More about Relocation Africa
Relocation Africa is an African Mobility Service Company that assists individuals and corporate clients to settle their relocated families and employees into a new environment as efficiently as possible.

Website: www.relocationafrica.com
Twitter: @ReloAfrica
LinkedIn: Relocation Africa (PTY) LTD
Facebook: Relocation Africa

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More about TIRA
TIRA is an aligned network of quality mobility service providers. The network provides access to leading mobility experts from around the world that provide local solutions to global challenges. Network members exchange best practices and share this value with the industry through benchmarking exercises.

Website: www.tiranetwork.org
Twitter: @TIRAORG
LinkedIn: The International Relocation Associates (TIRA)
Facebook: The International Relocation Associates (TIRA)

 

Why you should use a relocation provider and what to look for

By

Relocation Africa Group, TIRA Member, South Africa

Relocating employees can be a time-consuming, costly, and confusing process. But it doesn’t have to be. Making use of a Relocation Service Provider has numerous advantages for your business. We asked our Director, Rene, for an overview of the reasons you should do so, and what to consider when looking for the best service provider for your needs.

What would you say are some of the downsides to a company deciding to manage relocating their employees in-house?

Companies could end up spending 80% of their time on 20% of their employees. Unless all those relocating are going to the same location, it’s difficult to build resources and have a bank of information about each location when not using experts in each of those locations. In contrast to Destination Service Providers, companies might not have capability to negotiate on behalf of their employees. Human Resources’ time could be better spent – potentially making the business more money and developing employees.

What are some advantages to using a Relocation Provider?

Focused knowledge, expertise, and support along the journey. There are also potential cost and time savings due to the reasons mentioned above.

What should I look for when choosing a provider?

Don’t only look at cost – it’s only one factor. A successful assignment has other elements to it. Consider compliance – whether the provider has all the necessary checks and balances, such as ISO 9001 and industry quality standards. An example is whether a provider has reached the audit requirements to gain the EuRA Global Quality Seal (EGQS). Also look into how long the provider has existed for, and judge whether they are likely to continue to be in existence when you need them a few years into the future.

Look into how they vet and recruit their people, as well as whether they have the required insurance. Get feedback from previous clients of theirs, and, if possible, perform a site visit to see if what they are saying about their presence in a location is accurate. Consider their alliances and memberships, such as with The International Relocation Associates (TIRA).

Finally, there is a big difference between a mover and Destination Service Provider (DSP), and there can be confusion in the industry. DSPs focus on people, not boxes. It is important to understand exactly what the provider does, and where its focus areas are and capabilities lie.

What should I do if I’m struggling to work with my current provider?

Ultimately you want to fix the problem. Partner appropriately – remember you are both trying to service the client (assignee) as best as possible. Focus on bringing things back from red to amber to green as soon as possible. Work together to solve the problem, rather than pointing fingers. Consider whether the problem is a first, or a repeating one, before considering moving to a new provider. Resolve the issue in the best interests of the assignee.

Is it best to go with a global company, or one that is located in and specializes in the area I’m interested in?

It is definitely better to use a regional provider – one located in the country the assignee/s will be moving to, as it is too broad for one global provider to have expert experience in every area. If, for example, you are moving employees into or around Africa, use a provider that has years of experience focused on that continent.

Any insights on industry trends happening right now?

One trend is the shift from longer-term programs to shorter-term programs. Another is finding ways to add value for assignees and clients by using available technology and data. There is a general trend of companies disproportionately placing price over value, quality of service, and compliance. This needs to be considered in terms of risk aversion, taking new legislation such as GDPR into account, as well as long-term success working with the provider, in order to enhance the true overall value of using an expert.

So there you have it. Using a trusted Relocation Provider can not only save you time and money, but help prevent unforeseen problems with relocating employees around the globe. With over 25 years of experience across the African continent, Relocation Africa would be happy to assist you with your mobility needs, and help you embrace the unknown.

This article was originally published here.

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More about Relocation Africa
Relocation Africa is an African Mobility Service Company that assists individuals and corporate clients to settle their relocated families and employees into a new environment as efficiently as possible.

Website: www.relocationafrica.com
Twitter: @ReloAfrica
LinkedIn: Relocation Africa (PTY) LTD
Facebook: Relocation Africa

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More about TIRA
TIRA is an aligned network of quality mobility service providers. The network provides access to leading mobility experts from around the world that provide local solutions to global challenges. Network members exchange best practices and share this value with the industry through benchmarking exercises.

Website: www.tiranetwork.org
Twitter: @TIRAORG
LinkedIn: The International Relocation Associates (TIRA)
Facebook: The International Relocation Associates (TIRA)

Getting to know South Africa

 

By Andrew Stegmann
Relocation Africa Group, TIRA Member, South Africa

Some facts you perhaps did not know about South Africa (officially the Republic of South Africa, and located at the southern tip of Africa).

When you first meet someone, how do you greet them?
Men and women generally shake hands. Friends hug and kiss.

What languages are spoken in your country?
South Africa has 11 official languages: English, Zulu, Afrikaans, Xhosa, Swati, Tswana, Southern Sotho, Northern Sotho, Tsonga, Venda, and Ndebele

About South African English on a lighter note:
South African English has a flavour all its own, borrowing freely from Afrikaans, which is similar to Dutch and Flemish, as well as from the country’s many African languages. Some words come from colonial-era Malay and Portuguese immigrants.

Here are some examples:
bakgat: [buck-ghut] Well done, cool, awesome.
bakkie: [buck-ee] A pick-up truck.
boerewors: A type of sausage that originated in South Africa. The name is derived from the Afrikaans words boer (farmer) and wors (sausage).
born-frees: South Africans who were born into a democratic South Africa – that is, after 1994.
braai: [br-eye] An outdoor barbecue, where meat such as steak, chicken, and boerewors are cooked, served with pap and bredie.
bru: [brew] A term of affection, shortened from Afrikaans broer, meaning “brother”. An example would be, “Hey, my bru, howzit?”
chill bru: Relax, my mate. Take it easy.
eish: [aysh] Used to express surprise, wonder, frustration or outrage: “Eish! That cut was eina!”
gogo: [goh-goh] Grandmother or elderly woman, from isiZulu.
gogga, goggo: [gho-gha or gho-gho] Insect, bug. From the Khoikhoi xo-xon.
howzit: A traditional South African greeting that translates roughly as “How are you?”, “How are things?”, or simply “Hello”.
Jozi: [jo-zee] The city of Johannesburg, South Africa’s largest city, which is also known as Joburg, Joeys, and Egoli (the city of gold).
just now: If a South African tells you they will do something “just now”, they mean they’ll do it in the near future – not immediately, as in, “I’ll do the dishes just now.”
now-now: Shortly, in a bit, as in, “I’ll be there now-now.”
lekker: [lekk-irr with a rolling r] Nice, good, great, cool or tasty.
sharp or sharp-sharp: Good, fine, okay, great.
shebeen: A township tavern, illegal under the apartheid regime, often set up in a private house and frequented by black South Africans. The word is originally Gaelic.
takkies: Running shoes or sneakers. “Fat takkies” are extra- wide tyres.
tsotsi: A gangster, hoodlum or thug – and the title of South Africa’s first Oscar-winning movie.
voetsek: [foot-sak] Go away, buzz off.

Do you use a twelve-hour clock, or a twenty-four hour clock?
We tend to use both completely arbitrarily

What side of the road do people drive on? What do we need to know about driving in South Africa?
We drive on the left-hand side of the road. Road infrastructure is mostly good, and drivers tend to generally stick to the rules, but first-time visitors beware – our minibus taxis have a mind of their own, and their own set of rules, which basically means that they do exactly as they please.
Note that the South African word for traffic lights is robots.

How important is punctuality?
Don’t be late! In fact, try to arrive to an appointment five minutes early. South Africans are punctual and being late is considered rude (though this may not always ring true with the Capetonians, who have their own ideas on time-keeping).

Which types of music are popular? Who are some of your most popular musicians?
South Africa has a vast range of music including Miriam Makeba, Johnny Clegg, Freshlyground, The Parlotones, Just Jinjer, Eden and Goldfish to name but a few.
Kwaito is a music genre that emerged in Johannesburg, South Africa, during the 1990s. It is a variant of house music featuring the use of African sounds and samples.

Listen to Kwaito star Mandoza sing Nkalakatha
Listen to Miriam Makeba singing Pata Pata
and Freshlyground with Doo Be Doo
and Bright Blue with Weeping

Are there any Traditional Dances?
Yes, there are many. Some examples are:
The Zulu Reed Dance – watching thousands of young girls attired in traditional Zulu dress sing, dance and celebrate their culture is a powerful and moving experience.
Volkspele – a South African folk dance tradition. The dress originated from the formal dress the pioneers or Voortrekkers wore.
And watch this video to see some traditional Setswana and Gumboot Dancing:

What traditional Festivals are celebrated in your community?
Due to our cultural diversity and different regional areas we have many food, art, craft, music and cultural festivals taking place all over South Africa every year. One of the oldest and most colourful is the Kaapse Klopse (also known as Tweede Nuwejaar – Second New Year) traditionally celebrated in Cape Town on the second of January. Watch this to get a little taste of it.

What are your seasons like?
South Africa is famous for its sunshine. It’s a relatively dry country, with an average annual rainfall of about 464mm (compared to a world average of about 860mm). While the Western Cape gets most of its rainfall in winter, the rest of the country is generally a summer-rainfall region. In summer, temperatures can reach as high as 45° C in some places, and in winter, as low as -13° C.

What are South Africa’s major industries?
Among the key sectors that contribute to the gross domestic product and keep the economic engine running are manufacturing, retail, financial services, communications, mining, agriculture and tourism.

How do people spend their free time?
Socialising around the ‘braai’, watching or playing rugby, soccer or cricket, going to the beach, eating out, enjoying sports of all kinds.
Our national sports teams are the Springboks (rugby), Bafana-Bafana (soccer), and the Proteas (cricket).
Many South Africans are sports fanatics (regardless of whether actually participating or just spectating), and we also host many international sporting events such as The Comrades and Two Oceans Marathons, and the Cape Town Cycle Tour (formerly known as the ‘Cape Argus’).

What do people drink?
Beer, wine, and brandy and coke (very popular with all locals)
Traditional beer was brewed from local grains, especially sorghum. Beer was traditionally so prized that it became central to many ceremonies, like betrothals and weddings, in which one family ceremoniously offered beer to the other family.
Umqombothi, from the Xhosa language, is a traditional beer made in the Transkei, from maize (corn), maize malt, sorghum malt, yeast and water.
Mageu is a traditional South African non-alcoholic drink, popular among many of the Nguni people, made from fermented mealie pap. Home production is still widely practiced, but the drink is also available at many supermarkets.
Rooibos Tea: [roy-borss] Afrikaans for red bush, this popular South African tea made from the Cyclopia genistoides bush is gaining worldwide popularity for its health benefits.
Amarula is a cream liqueur from South Africa. It is made with sugar, cream and the fruit of the African marula tree which is also locally called the Elephant tree or the Marriage Tree

What is a popular local dish?
There are too many to name only one – here are some of our traditional foods:
Bobotie: {buh-boor-tee] A dish of Malay origin, made with minced meat and spices, and topped with an egg sauce.
Boerewors: [boor-uh-vors] Literally, “farmer’s sausage”. A savoury sausage developed by the Boers – today’s Afrikaners – some 200 years ago, boerewors is South African food at its most traditional.
Biltong: [bill-tong] This South African favourite is dried and salted meat, similar to beef jerky, although it can be made from ostrich, kudu or any other red meat.
Bunny chow: Delicious and cheap food on the go, bunny chow is curry served in a hollowed-out half-loaf of bread, generally sold in greasy-spoon cafés.
Droëwors: [droo-uh-vors] Dried boerewors, similar to biltong.
Koeksister: [kook-sister] A traditional Malay and now also Afrikaner sweet, made from twisted yeast dough, deep fried and dipped in syrup. The word comes from the Dutch koek (“cake”) and sissen, meaning “to sizzle”.
Malva Pudding: is a sweet pudding of Cape Dutch origin. It contains apricot jam and has a spongy caramelized texture. A cream sauce is often poured over it while it is hot, and it is usually served hot with custard and/or ice-cream.
Melktert: which means “milk tart” in Afrikaans, is a South African dessert consisting of a sweet pastry crust containing a creamy filling made from milk, flour, sugar and eggs.
Pap: [pup] The staple food of South Africa, a porridge made from mealie meal (maize meal) cooked with water and salt to a fairly stiff consistency, stywepap being the stiffest.
Samoosa: [suh-moo-suh] A small, spicy, triangular-shaped pie deep-fried in oil. Originally made by the Indian and Malay communities, samoosas – known as samosas in Britain – are popular with all South Africans.
Vetkoek: [fet-cook] “Fat cake” in Afrikaans, vetkoek is a doughnut-sized bread roll made from deep-fried yeast dough. Mainly served with a savoury mince filling, it is artery-clogging and delicious.

What do you pay for? (1 USD = approx. ZAR 11.00)
In a restaurant… A cup of coffee – R20.00, a Coca Cola – R15.00, a 2-Course meal for 2 people (nothing extravagant) – R300.00, average glass of wine – white – R35.00
At a shop… A loaf of bread – R11.00. A bottle of milk – R22.00

General Safety?
Unfortunately, due to the extreme divides between poverty and wealth and rising unemployment figures, crime is very much a fact of life in South Africa and one has to be vigilant and aware at all times and take safety precautions wherever possible.

And in conclusion…
Famous (and sometimes infamous…) South Africans include:
Nelson Mandela
Archbishop Desmond Tutu
Charlize Theron (Actress)
Mark Shuttleworth (Internet Billionaire & Space Tourist)
Oscar Pistorius (Fallen Paralympic Athlete)
Evita Bezuidenhout aka Pieter Dirk Uys (probably the most famous white woman in South Africa)

If you are planning on relocating to or mobilising employees in South Africa, Relocation Africa will provide seamless professional immigration and destination services to enable expatriates to be effective employees as soon as possible. We align our innovations and services to support our loyal client’s specific requirements.

This article was originally published here.
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More about Relocation Africa
Relocation Africa is an African Mobility Service Company that assists individuals and corporate clients to settle their relocated families and employees into a new environment as efficiently as possible.

Website: www.relocationafrica.com
Twitter: @ReloAfrica
LinkedIn: Relocation Africa (PTY) LTD
Facebook: Relocation Africa

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More about TIRA
TIRA is an aligned network of quality mobility service providers. The network provides access to leading mobility experts from around the world that provide local solutions to global challenges. Network members exchange best practices and share this value with the industry through benchmarking exercises.

Website: www.tiranetwork.org
Twitter: @TIRAORG
LinkedIn: The International Relocation Associates (TIRA)
Facebook: The International Relocation Associates (TIRA)

Immigration changes in Angola, Australia, Mozambique, Qatar, Romania, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, and Turkey.

AUSTRALIA | Changes to Health Insurance Requirements for 457 Visas and Proposed Changes to Eligible Occupations Lists
Pro-Link GLOBAL is following two developments impacting companies employing foreign nationals in Australia. The first concerns a change to health insurance requirements for foreign employees applying for Subclass 457 Visas. The second concerns proposed future changes to the eligible occupations lists for Australia’s employment-based visa categories.

Changes to Health Insurance Requirements for 457 Visa Applicants

Starting November 18, foreign nationals applying for subclass 457 visas are no longer required to provide documentation confirming their health insurance coverage – such as a letter from an insurer – as part of the visa application process. The online application form has been amended to simply require applicants to indicate that they have made adequate arrangements for health insurance for their intended period of stay in Australia. This change applies to all subclass 457 visa applicants, including family members and subsequent entrants, and is effective for all applications lodged and still pending adjudication on November 18.

 

MOZAMIBIQUE | DIRE Residency Document No Longer Required for New Foreign Hires
Effective immediately, foreign nationals entering Mozambique with a work visa will no longer be required to obtain an Identification and Residency Document for Foreigners (DIRE). Instead, their work visas will be extended up to one year based on the length their employment contracts.

This change only affects new hires going forward. Current DIRE holders will continue to use their DIRE until their current work visa expires. Also note that this change only applies to the work visa holder, and dependent family members of work visa holders are still required to obtain a DIRE.

 

QATAR | 30-Day Visas-On-Arrival May Only Be Extended Through New Online Portal
The Qatari Ministry of Interior (MOI) has announced that visitors who have entered Qatar on a 30-day tourist visa-on-arrival and who wish to extend their stay for an additional 30 days must do so through a new online portal, rather than through the Airport Passports Department.

This measure applies to visitors from the 46 countries whose nationals are eligible for the 180-day multiple-entry visas-on-arrival to Qatar. These visas are valid for stays of up to 30 days, renewable in-country for an additional 30 days. Eligible citizens include those of Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, India, Ireland, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Russia, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, the United Kingdom, and the United States nationalities. A complete list of eligible nationals is available here. Note that this change does not apply to nationals of the 34 countries who are eligible for visa-free entry for stays of up to 90 days, which are not eligible to extend their stays in-country.

 

ROMANIA | 2017 Quotas for Local Hire and Secondment Work Permits Exhausted
In Romania, the 2017 quotas of work permits both for local hires and secondments has been exhausted, and the 2018 quotas may not be available before the end of this year. Therefore, currently pending work permit applications in these categories will not be approved. However, work permits for other categories – such as intra-company transferees, highly-skilled workers, and trainees – are still available for the current year.

Details regarding how authorities are treating pending applications in these affected categories are now being released, but remain unclear. If the 2018 quotas are released within 30 days of the application submission, these applications will be processed under the new quotas. If the new quotas are not released within 30 days of submission, the application deadline will reportedly be extended by 15 days to allow those applications to be processed from the new quotas. However, it is also unclear whether this extension will be automatic or if the applicant must request it.

 

SAUDI ARABIA | New Online Document Attestation Service at Riyadh Chamber of Commerce
The Riyadh Chamber of Commerce has launched a new online attestation service for some documents involved in the immigration process. The online service is available through the “My Business Portal” and allows users to complete the attestation of certain documents – including the visa request letter to the Labor Office – without the need of visiting the Chamber offices in person. Note that some documents that require physical attestation – such as Saudization certificates, business agreements, employment contracts, family visas, and other government forms – will continue to require in-person visits.

 

SOUTH AFRICA & ANGOLA | New Reciprocal Visa Waiver
Effective December 1, the South African Department of Home Affairs (DHA) will implement a reciprocal visa waiver for Angolan citizens for stays of up to 30, to a maximum of 90 days per year. Angolan passport holders will no longer require Port of Entry Visas in advance of travel to South Africa for the purposes of general business, tourism, or family visits and will be issued a 30-day Visitor’s Visa at the Port of Entry upon arrival in South Africa. Reciprocally, Angolan authorities are expected to no longer require visas for South African citizens to enter Angola for the same purposes and periods of stay.

 

TURKEY | Latest State Department Guidance on U.S. Citizens Traveling to Turkey
On November 21, the United States Department of State issued an update on the latest status for U.S. citizens entering Turkey. The key points of this latest State Department guidance are as follows:

  • Airports in Turkey – U.S. citizens (with no other nationality) will be issued sticker visas upon entry into Turkey if they can show legal residency (residence permits) in another country other than the U.S. Note that this is a clear departure from the policy over the past month where all U.S. citizens were regularly being issued sticker visas at Turkish airports as long as their flight originated outside the U.S.;
  • Turkish consulates outside the U.S. are now consistently issuing visas to U.S. nationals physically present at that consular post without issue. However, whether a particular consulate requires the U.S. applicant to have a verifiable local residence continues to be apparently considered on a case-by-case basis;
  • Turkish consular posts inside the U.S. are still offering visa appointments to U.S. citizens in some cases, based on certain criteria such as medical needs, urgent family issues, international conferences, or sporting events, etc.; and
  • Currently valid Turkish visas (including sticker visas) continue to be accepted by border authorities for entry into Turkey.

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